Congratulations, you’re creative.

Now get to work!

At DragonCon 2014 on Friday night at 7pm, I’ll be giving a presentation in the Hyatt Hanover A – B called “Congratulations, you’re creative. Now get to work.” I invite all creative types to visit and have a chat about your creative career.

I meet so many people telling me they’re an artist, creative, and have a passion for what ever it may be. Great, welcome to our creative circle of trust. Now get to work. I’m sharing with you my professional philosophies that have brought my success in a happy, healthy art and design career. 

If you just need a job, everyone needs to be born, to be educated, and to die.
There will always be jobs in those three areas.

Power of your people

  • Funny people are successful.
  • Smart and funny people are more successful.
  • Being pretty doesn’t hurt, but it doesn’t always work.
  • Drink with friends. Don’t take drinks from strangers.
  • Good sportsmanship is always admired. Bad sportsmanship is always recorded.

Self-marketing Skills

  • Embrace your unique style. 
  • Take pride in your work.
  • Never give someone the stick to beat you with.
  • Wolves smell weakness. Present yourself in a manner that is kind, strong, confident, and prepared. 

Interviewing Techniques

  • Work for knowledge, not money. 
  • Ask weird questions. They get the best answers.

Design Industry Business Practices

  • Don’t just stand there, do something or get out of the way.
  • Don’t say or THINK anything close to “oh, I don’t know that software . . “Oh, I only do ____________.”
  • Learn, take chances, and learn some more.
  • Get lost just to learn how to find your way.

Always, always, always changing. That’s the one thing in life we know for sure – things change.

Make space for art in your life.

From small to big, you can always make space for art in your life. In this lesson, I’ll talk about realistic and affordable ways to make some space for art supplies and to work.

X Small on the go: pencil bag and drawing pad | working space is a drawing board

Small: toolbox and storage portfolio

Medium: desktop easel and storage unit

Large: use the walls to work and store your equipment | invest in a nice easel


Art supplies to get the party started!

  1. Portfolio | portfolio, approximately 30″ x 24.” large enough for your biggest pad of paper
  2. Paper | bound sketchbooks. 8.5″ x 11.” 50-100 page; large drawing newsprint pads. 18″ x 24″; XL Mix media pads;  tracing paper pad
  3. Drawing Media | One each Graphite pencils: B, 2B, 4B, and 8B; boxes of vine charcoal; white charcoal pencil; Sanford Ebony graphite pencils Soft 14420
  4. Other Drawing Supplies | kneaded erasers; Magic rub erasers; straight-edge; Clip/clamp light: (available at hardware stores); plastic Oval palette; roll of 1″ masking tape (not blue tape!); ruler; pencil sharpener; Xacto knife; standard T-Square 24″; dry cleaning pad

Resources

Dick Blick | http://www.dickblick.com

Sam Flax | http://www.samflaxsouth.com

Look trouble in the face.

Howdy All! Today’s creative minds tips are really 3 things:

1. Look Trouble in the Face

2. You’re not in control of everything

3. Go take a break

Design on,

L. Rush

Morse Museum

Located in the charming town of Winter Park, Florida is The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art. This is an impressive collection of famous American craftsmen, but the main focus is the work of Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933).  As you walk through the collections, you really get a snapshot of American design history and the labor of love. This is a must see for fans of the American Arts & Crafts movement or of the Art Nouveau movement.

The show stopper is for sure the Tiffany Chapel. It was originally designed in 1893 and exhibited at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The Morse Museum reassembled it in 1999. When you get there, take a moment to sit down and just take this whole space in. The detail and craftsmanship is to be respected.

My personal favorite find the whole museum is the invites that Louis Tiffany would make. I found them to be so personal and made with love, that I think all my future invites should be made by hand.

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To plan you visit, go to http://www.morsemuseum.org/ for more information.

~ Live in Design History ~

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Designer to Designer:
Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry’s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, yet my clients are FREAKED OUT when I use it.  I’ve been asked so many times this week on why did I write it in another language . . . :). Folks are so cute.

My lovely colleague just shared with me a great, funny resource to use in place of that. Check it out. http://hipsteripsum.me/

Then one of my alumni students sent me this one, http://baconipsum.com/.

Paper Museum

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Just off of 10th Street in Atlanta, Georgia you can find a the Robert C. Williams Paper Museum. It’s located on the lobby floor of the Institute of Paper Science and Technology on Georgia Tech’s campus.

The collection is small, but valuable in explaining the history of paper making and showing great examples of the design process through the ages and within different cultures. The museum features a collection of over 10,000 watermarks, papers, tools, machines, and manuscripts.

If you’d like a tour, it’s easy enough to just walk in during the week. If you have a group of 10 or more, I suggest you call ahead to let them know. Parking is limited and you can ask the front desk if you can park around the back when you have a large group.

The Robert C. Williams Paper Museum is located at:

Institute of Paper Science and Technology
Mail code 0620, Georgia Tech
500 10th Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0620

Enjoy life long learning,

Lindsey Rush Hawkins

Buffalo Bill Museum

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While on my trip in Denver, I took the time to visit an American Legend – William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody. His grave is located in Lookout Mountain Park, part of the Denver Mountain Parks system. The site overlooks the Great Plains and the Rockies.

To see more, I went to the Buffalo Bill Museum. Much to my surprise the museum has a great collection of design history. There I found products, fashion design, furniture design, board games, posters, and even graphic novels all about the interesting Buffalo Bill. All of these unique pieces of design from the late 1800′s and early 1900′s illustrated the life and legend of William F. Cody. Within the designs, I could see the influence of the Victorian Era, Art Nouveau, and different cultures found at the World Fairs during that time in history.

Right next door is a fun gift shop with a friendly staff and dog. Ladies beware of the feeling of being watched as you walk down into the bathroom. The site has even been investigated on the SyFi show Ghost Hunters. Check it out sometime: Ghost Hunters: Season Five, Part 2, Disc #2 Episode 8: Ghost of Buffalo Bill.

If you’re in Denver, do take the time to see the beauty that surroundings and the unique collection of design history. The site is located at 987 1/2 Lookout Mountain Road, Golden, CO 80401. For more information, go to www.buffalobill.org.

Happy Trails,

Lindsey Rush Hawkins

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